2016 Instructional Design and Innovation

Deadline to Register/Application Deadline: 
Tuesday, December 22, 2015 - 5:00pm

The Academic Senate for California Community Colleges is pleased to announce the first annual Instructional Design and Innovation Institute. This new institute will focus on strategies to improve student success and build more effective college programs. Discussions will include many exciting and timely topics like cultivating partnerships to create new opportunities for students, improving the collaboration between instruction and student services on our campuses, discovering different strategies in curricular design, integrating instructional technology into the classroom to enhance teaching, and effectively institutionalizing innovative programs to ensure they do not disappear. 

Registration

 

The Instructional Design and Innovation Institute will be held at the Riverside Convention Center located at  3637 5th St, Riverside, CA 92501. For driving directions, please visit the provided link: http://www.riversidecvb.com/convention-center-parking.  The Riverside Convention Center has extended a discounted parking rate of $8.00 per day for attendees.

If you are interested in registering for the Institute, please visit us at the Riverside Convention Center. Registration will open at 7:30am on Thursday, January 21st  and will be located on the Upper Concourse level near Exhibit Hall B,C, & D. Registration fees and additional Insitute information is listed below. We look forwrad to seeing you in Riverside!

REGISTRATION FEES

Late Registration Fee (after December 22, 2015): $445

The cost includes breakfast and lunch onThursday and Friday, breakfast on Saturday, an evening reception and conference materials. 

Payment for early registration must be made by December 22, 2015.  Payment is required in full prior to attending the conference.

 ASCCC FOUNDATION PUB CRAWL FUNDRAISER - This event has limited availability and will sell out!!  

***GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!!*** Support the Academic Senate Foundation!

On Thursday January 21st at 7:30pm we will be doing a Downtown Riverside organized Pub Crawl to support the Academic Senate Foundation.

Included in your ticket: Stops at 4 different restaurant/pubs with food and a beverage at each.

Ticket Price: $60

 If you are interested in attending the Pub Crawl, please come to the registration desk to inquire about availability.

CANCELLATIONS

The cancellation deadline for a full refund is December 22, 2015 and will be assessed a $50 processing fee. Refunds will not be granted for cancellations after the posted cancellation deadline of December 22, 2015.  If you would like to cancel your registration, please send an email to iidinstitute [at] asccc.orgPlease review the Senate Cancellation Policy here. Call Edie Martinelli, ASCCC Event Planner, at (916) 445-4753 x 102 with any other payment questions.

Hotel & Travel

Hotel Reservation and Parking Information:

Please book your room at the Riverside Marriott, a short walking distrance from the Riverside Convention Center.

The Mission Inn is currently sold out of our room block.

Reservations at the Marriott can be made online through this reservation link: Book your group rate for ACADEMIC SENATE FOR CA. COMM. COLLEGES

Marriott Parking will be at the rate of $8 per day.

Internet will be complimentary in your guest room.

We are over our rooming deadline, however the Marriott still has rooms available.  Please contact them and make sure you tell them you are with ASCCC.

Day-time Attendees:

The Riverside Convention Center offers parking at the rate of $8 per day.

Presentation Materials

Title Breakout Time
Collaborative Efforts: Approaching a Common Understanding of College Readiness January 21, 2016 - 10:15am
Instructional Strategies: Program Review and SLO Assessment Data - The Stepping Stones to Classroom Innovation January 21, 2016 - 10:15am
Institutional Effectiveness Partnership Initiative: Reflections on Partnership Resource Team Visits January 21, 2016 - 10:15am
Institutionalization: Baccalaureate Degrees at the California Community Colleges January 21, 2016 - 10:15am
Where Are They Now, and How Did They Get There! January 21, 2016 - 12:00pm
Student Data: Greater Success with Higher Placement, Shorter Remedial Sequences, and Student Development Support January 21, 2016 - 2:15pm
Online: High Touch Online Classes —What We Learned from Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) January 21, 2016 - 2:15pm
Student Engagement: Early Alert Supports an Engage Classroom January 21, 2016 - 2:15pm
Collaborative Efforts: Moving Beyond the Program—Equity-Based Instruction Using Puente Principles January 21, 2016 - 2:15pm
Fostering Innovation: Creating an Institutional Culture of Innovation January 21, 2016 - 4:00pm
Online: Common Course Design Issues January 21, 2016 - 4:00pm
Student Engagement: Acceleration January 21, 2016 - 4:00pm
Collaborative Efforts: Professional Development for Online Faculty January 22, 2016 - 9:00am
Student Engagement: Programs At-A-Glance—Designing Course Sequencing Flowcharts January 22, 2016 - 9:00am
Fostering Innovation: Effective Practices for Department Chairs —Supporting a Student-Centered Culture January 22, 2016 - 9:00am
Online: Promoting Online Course Quality —Adopting and Employing a Standard to Improve Student Outcomes January 22, 2016 - 10:45am
Collaborative Efforts: First Year Experience at West Valley College - A Growing Collaboration Between Student Services and Instruction January 22, 2016 - 10:45am
Student Engagement: High Challenge, High Support Math Instruction for Streamlining Paths to Transfer January 22, 2016 - 10:45am
Civic Engagement and Global Citizenship in Higher Education: The Role of the Community College January 22, 2016 - 12:30pm
Student Engagement: Online Counseling Services January 22, 2016 - 2:15pm
Fostering Innovation: Creating a Path to Success for Incarcerated Students January 22, 2016 - 2:15pm
Instructional Strategies: Embedding Basic Skills Support into Face-to-face and Online Courses January 22, 2016 - 2:15pm
Collaboration: All About Building Bridges - Developing Strategic Partnerships in Your Community and Statewide January 22, 2016 - 2:15pm
Collaboration: Bay Area Shared Remote Access ICT Lab System January 22, 2016 - 4:00pm
Fostering Innovation: Constructing a Learning Environment January 22, 2016 - 4:00pm
Student Engagement: Working Holistically with Your Students Using Starfish Degree Planner January 22, 2016 - 4:00pm
Online: The Distance Ed Classroom, Online Student Services, and Standard II - Putting Your Best Feet Forward January 22, 2016 - 4:00pm
Institutionalization: Designing a Completion Initiative: Our Response to the Question, “What do you mean our students aren’t completing?!” January 23, 2016 - 8:30am
Collaborative Efforts: General Education and Quantitative Reasoning January 23, 2016 - 8:30am

Program

Click here to download the program (PDF)

Program for Thursday, January 21, 2016
Program for Friday, January 22, 2016
Program for Saturday, January 23, 2016

Thursday, January 21, 2016

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Pilates with Pilati
MR 6 (Lower Level)

Start the day right! Join fellow attendees for a one-hour Pilates session. Plan ahead and bring a mat, or improvise with borrowed towels. This Pilates mat class will focus on developing core strength, flexibility, and stamina. Appropriate for all levels - no previous Pilates experience needed.

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast
Exhibit Hall C/D

8:30 am – 10:00 am General Session
Exhibit Hall B

Welcome
Craig Rutan, Faculty Development Committee Chair

Keynote Presentation: The Mobility Revolution
The keynote address will be delivered by a leading digital learning expert and former educator who works for a Fortune 100 high tech company.

“It’s time to rethink the classroom.” It’s a call to action we hear often, but what does it mean for today’s educators to begin to deconstruct their teaching practices? Do devices have a place in the classroom? How can technology function in a learning environment? This keynote presentation will examine the disruptive force of mobile technology on our long-held assumptions about teaching, classroom-based learning, and access to content. Because instructional best practices are always evolving, this talk will not be about showcasing the latest tech fads. It will explore the profound possibilities of leveraging a mobile-connected world to create authentic, differentiated, transformative experiences for all learners..

10:00 am – 10:15 am Coffee Break

10:15 am – 11:45 am First Breakout Session

Instructional Strategies: Program Review and SLO Assessment Data - The Stepping Stones to Classroom Innovation
RC A Room

Randy Beach, ASCCC Facilitator
Kelly Cooper, West Valley College
Bill Scroggins, Mt. San Antonio College

Analysis of student learning outcome (SLO) results is intended to drive teaching and classroom design innovation. Such innovations often rely on additional funding and other resources to get off the ground, and at most colleges’ program review is the mechanism to request funding. Student learning outcomes data can therefore provide vital leverage to support course and program innovations in program review. In this breakout, attendees will learn strategies and approaches to using SLO data as grassroots advocacy for their innovations.

Collaborative Efforts: Approaching a Common Understanding of College Readiness
RC B Room

Craig Rutan, ASCCC Facilitator
Mark Manasse, San Diego Miramar College
Glen McClish, San Diego State University
Chris Sullivan, San Diego Mesa College
Gina Vattuone, Sweetwater Unified School District

What does just ready for college writing look like? How do practitioners in the language arts communicate with one another about issues such as preparedness, pedagogy, curriculum, and professional development? Collegiality and a belief in the success of all students, regardless of goal or ultimate destination, can carry the day in the development of collaborative efforts between systems. Panelists will share perspectives from K-12 (including the role of the Common Core State Standards and their assessment), the university, and the community colleges (both credit and noncredit).

Institutionalization: Baccalaureate Degrees at the California Community Colleges
RC C Room

John Stanskas, ASCCC Facilitator
Jolena Grande, Cypress College
James Todd, Modesto Junior College

The passage of SB850 in September 2014 enabled 15 pilot colleges to begin offering baccalaureate degrees in career technical education fields. The time frame established by the legislation requires pilot colleges to show degree conferral and job placement by 2022. Local college and statewide processes are moving at an incredible pace to meet the timeline creating opportunities for both innovation and conflict. Join us for a lively discussion regarding disruptive innovation, grace under pressure, and what your college might look forward to once the pilot program expands.

Fostering Innovation: Making Across the Curriculum —The Modern Maker Movement and Interdisciplinary Innovation
RC D Room

John Freitas, ASCCC Facilitator
Zack Dowell, Folsom Lake College Innovation Center

From open source electronics enthusiasts to yarn bombers to biohackers, makers view the physical world as a hackable platform. In hackerspaces, makerspaces, and fab labs, communities of makers combine science, art, and technology to tweak and reinvent the world. Advancements in desktop fabrication technologies, coupled with the DIY/DIWO maker ethos, support Making Across the Curriculum, a unique approach to interdisciplinary innovation. The tools and technologies of the maker movement enable the development of creative and engaging activities and projects across a variety of disciplines, both inside and outside the classroom, and to the development of new courses and programs. Through shared examples of Making Across the Curriculum, attendees will learn how they can employ the spirit and tools of the modern making movement to collaborate with colleagues, foster innovative projects, and create compelling and engaging experiences for students.

Student Data: Reimagining Student Capacity through Multiple Measures

RC E Room

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC Facilitator
Janet Fulks, Bakersfield College
Ken Sorey, Educational Results Partnership and Cal-PASS Plus

This interactive session will discuss the growing body of research supporting the application of multiple measures for placement that can help colleges fundamentally reimagine student capacity. The presenters will analyze the application of enhanced multiple measures for improved placement across the California Community College System as part of the Multiple Measures Assessment Project (MMAP) and the Common Assessment Initiative. This breakout will provide information on the performance of multiple measures predictive models using high school performance data and non-cognitive variables for each level of English and math sequences and will share the experiences of pilot colleges — now 39 and growing. In addition, participants will hear detailed information about Bakersfield College’s Making it Happen Initiative to better place and support historically underserved and academically underprepared students.

Student Engagement: Contextualized Basic Skills in Auto Technology/VESL Collaboration
RC F Room

Grant Goold, ASCCC Facilitator
Carolyn McGavock, San Diego Continuing Education
Frank Vasquez, San Diego Continuing Education

Two San Diego Continuing Education instructors, one CTE and one Vocational English as a Second Language (VESL), will share their experience of team teaching an introductory course for Auto Technology. Presenters will share their contextualized curriculum which provides students with a foundation by introducing fundamental skills, concepts, and terminology with hands-on experiences that are complemented with relevant math, reading, writing, and research activities. The breakout will address planning, collaboration, assessment for placement, orientation, curriculum, instructional models, and student outcomes.

Vendor: Getting Tactical and Practical on Teaching with Technology
MR 7 Room

Ginni May, ASCCC Facilitator
Christina G. Espinoza-Pieb, De Anza College
Jason LaMar, Columbus State College
Megan Raymond, Apple Education
Mary Pat Stein, California State University Northridge

This moderated panel discussion will consider the specifics of teaching with technology in today’s mobile classroom. The panelists include educators from around the country who are leading efforts to integrate technology in the classroom to prepare students for a 21st Century digital world. This dynamic and engaging conversation will explore and debate the structural, pedagogical, and creative support faculty need to be successful in leveraging technology to create authentic learning experiences. Attendees should come with questions, curiosity, or even skepticism and hear from leaders and practitioners about how they are discovering new strategies to ensure student success.

12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Second General Session
Exhibit Hall B

Where Are They Now, and How Did They Get There!

John Stanskas, ASCCC Facilitator
Kathy Molloy, Santa Barbara City College
Panelist:
Janet Fulks, Bakersfield College
Laura Hope, Chaffey College
Brock Klein, Pasadena City College
Cynthia Mosqueda, El Camino College
Jerry Pike, Santa Barbara City College

The basic skills work that began in 2006 was marked by a variety of curricular changes, innovations, and accountability factors (i.e. common graduation requirements, accelerated, compressed and contextualized curriculum, just-in-time academic skills brush-up, supplemental instruction, summer bridge and first year experience). The new Basic Skills funding focused on research based practice around curriculum, career pathways, assessment and placement, which of the BSI Poppy Copy (2007) 26 effective practices have actually produced success, been sustainable, and scaled up? This session will highlight a few programs with evidence based practices you should consider.

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. Break

2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Second Breakout Session

Instructional Strategies: Noncredit—An Innovative Approach to Serving Students
RC A Room

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC Facilitator
Diane Edwards-LiPera, Southwestern College

In 2014-2015, six community colleges districts generated 62% of the statewide noncredit FTES while the next five highest generated only 13% combined, less than each of the top two noncredit FTES generating districts. Attendees from schools outside the top 11 who are interested in how their schools can generate more noncredit FTES to meet student needs are encouraged to attend for a brief overview of noncredit as well as discussion about the role that noncredit education plays in career technical, adult basic education, transitioning students from adult school to community college, supporting credit courses, and serving as prerequisites for basic skills classes.

Collaborative Efforts: Moving Beyond the Program—Equity-Based Instruction Using Puente Principles
RC B Room

Cleavon Smith, ASCCC Facilitator
AnaMarie Amezquita, Moreno Valley College
Kim Orlijan, Fullerton College
Alma Ramirez, Mt. San Jacinto College

This presentation will address ways in which the Puente Project’s practices, pedagogy, and curricular redesign can be brought into interactions with students across institutions. For over 30 years, the Puente Project has been extremely successful statewide—and now, also in Texas—in helping educationally disadvantaged students persist, succeed, and transfer. Part of the project’s success includes having well-trained Puente instructors in English and counseling who work closely together to create communities in and out of the classroom. Presenters will share specific Puente principles and how those principles play out in the work they do in and out of the classroom, including practices for creating community in the classroom as well as high-impact practices for attending to students’ affective domain. Participants will leave with specific strategies for how to bring those successful principles and practices to their own interactions with students both in and out of the classroom.

Institutionalization: Changing the Conversation on Academic Integrity
RC C Room

Wheeler North, ASCCC Executive Committee
Jason Edington, Mendocino College
Corinna Evett, Santiago Canyon College
Cynthia Reiss, West Valley College

Academic integrity is a topic of much concern on campuses: How does a college create a culture of integrity so that it becomes a learned behavior at a college? What innovations have faculty used to make integrity something that is practiced rather than just preached? Join us for a discussion of academic integrity and of how we create campus cultures that promote integrity.

Fostering Innovation: The College of the Desert (COD) Friends of the Earth: Cross-Curriculum Mental Health Fair
RC D Room

Adrienne Foster, ASCCC Facilitator
Jessica Enders, East Valley Education Centers
Karen Fliss, College of the Desert Mecca/Thermal Campus
Maria Herrera, College of the Desert Mecca/Thermal Campus
Jay Lewenstein, College of the Desert Mecca/Thermal Campus
Victor Rios, College of the Desert Mecca/Thermal Campus

The College of the Desert Mecca/Thermal Campus has initiated an across-the-campus project called COD Friends of the Earth to combine classroom instruction with community service. The focus is upon raising student performance in the classroom through the development of important leadership skills. The project has created an official campus-sanctioned club with the specific purpose of expanding student roles in their communities. Writing and research explore important elements of depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, addictions and overall mental health. Currently, the Friends of the Earth are working with staff and faculty towards reducing the stigma associated with mental illness through the development of an annual event that combines counseling, writing, art, and hope. This presentation will share COD’s ongoing systematic efforts to provide quality service learning opportunities to students, faculty, and staff.

Student Data: Greater Success with Higher Placement, Shorter Remedial Sequences, and Student Development Support
RC E Room

Craig Rutan, ASCCC Facilitator
Janet Fulks, Bakersfield College
Eileen Pierce, Bakersfield College

Bakersfield College has redesigned and restructured basic skills placement and coursework, creating a shorter and more successful pathway for students that is combined with wrap-around support services. College research revealed a “whittling syndrome” with the remedial sequences, a syndrome that not only affected unsuccessful students but also successful students. To address these issues, Bakersfield College implemented multiple measures based upon the Common Assessment Multiple Measures work-group suggestions and the ASCCC 2014 paper Multiple Measures in Assessment: The Requirements and Challenges of Multiple Measures in the California Community Colleges recommendations. Combining higher placement with compressed and accelerated coursework has shortened the path to gateway math and English classes, and as a result Bakersfield has seen increased success and closing of achievement gaps in gateway courses.

Student Engagement: Early Alert Supports an Engage Classroom
RC F Room

Cynthia Rico, ASCCC Facilitator
Sabra Sabio, El Camino College

The Chancellor’s Office has acquired Starfish by Hobsons—a suite of student services software solutions. Part of this suite includes an early alert product that will support colleges’ goals of improving student engagement, classroom retention, and persistence. This presentation will highlight how one college uses this product and its outcomes as well as how another college is implementing this product as part of the Educational Planning Initiative.

Online: High Touch Online Classes —What We Learned from Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs)
MR 7 Room

Dolores Davison, ASCCC Executive Committee
Adesanya (Sanya) Soyemi, Mt. San Jacinto College
Fabiola Torres, Glendale College

One emphasis in certification for online teaching is the use of “high touch” communication to keep students engaged. How can faculty create a high touch online class without sacrificing pedagogy or their own sanity? Faculty will share their experiences, both successes and challenges, in working with diverse groups of online students.

Vendor: CCC Confer & 3CMedia Solutions
MR 8 Room

John Freitas, ASCCC Facilitator
Michelle Musacchia, CCC Confer
Heather Schmidt, 3C Media Solutions

CCC Confer and 3CMedia Solutions partner to offer you innovative ways to improve learning and collaboration. CCC Confer is a web conferencing service that can be used to enhance student learning through live online interactive lectures, to record lectures for later viewing, or to hold virtual office hours. Recorded lectures can also be converted to movie files and loaded into a 3CMedia account that simplifies providing educational materials in a portable, timely manner. In this presentation, attendees will be encouraged to interact with the creative ways in which CCC Confer is being used in the classroom and in which 3CMedia services complements the partnership. Presenters hope to inspire participants to integrate these free and easy to use technologies into their online courses, on campus classes, and administrative meetings.

3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Break

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Third Breakout Session

Instructional Strategies: Transforming ESL Instruction with Metacognitive Conversation
RC A Room

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC Facilitator
Tiffany Ingle, Glendale College
Mark Manasse, San Diego Miramar College
Nancy Sander, West Los Angeles College

This presentation will focus on the importance of social and emotional learning to support metacognition in the ESL classroom. Professors from three colleges will model specific, high leverage classroom strategies and share samples of student work in order to actively engage participants in “metacognitive conversation” and more fully explore its potential for equitable second language learning environments.

Collaborative Efforts: Getting Change for a Dollar - The PSA Project   ***THIS BREAKOUT HAS BEEN CANCELLED***
RC B Room

Randy Beach, ASCCC Facilitator
Janene Whitesell, Solano College

Most students are aware of problems in both their local and global communities, and yet they may feel that they do not have the skill, time, or money required to create real change. Students also may think that their efforts are insignificant in the face of larger problems such health care in impoverished countries. Students at Solano College are realizing that solving any problem starts with making their voices heard about important, worldly matters and becoming agents of change through the following cross-disciplinary speaking assignment: The PSA Project. Each Public Speaking student creates a 1-minute Public Service Announcement (PSA) for a charity that the student wants the audience to support. This assignment enhances the concept of civic engagement in the classroom, promotes collaboration between students in different classes, and may be adapted to a variety of disciplines. Workshop participants will explore the principles of the project by creating a PSA and learning the technology for QR code creation and uploading to YouTube.

Institutionalization: Strengthening Student Success through Developmental Redesign
RC C Room

Cleavon Smith, ASCCC Facilitator
Janet Lechuga, Santa Ana College
Lynn Marecek, Santa Ana College
Lisa McKowan-Bourguignon, Santa Ana College

The presenters will share a curricular redesign process which involved team building, deciding which courses to redesign, defining departmental pedagogical values, researching redesign at other colleges, and adapting effective practices into a model that would work best for students. The department applied for grants, worked the courses through the curriculum process, and disseminated information across campus to inform all affected parties of the implications of redesign.

Fostering Innovation: Creating an Institutional Culture of Innovation
RC D Room

John Stanskas, ASCCC Facilitator
James Todd, Modesto Junior College
Rebeccah Warren-Marlatt, Crafton Hills College

Fear of failure can stifle innovation and keep colleges and faculty using the same models they have in place whether those models are effective or not. How does the culture of a college move to a space where innovation is celebrated regardless of the outcome? Join us for an important discussion on unleashing the creativity of ourselves and our colleagues to better serve our students.

Student Data: The LATTC Guardian Scholars Program–A Foster Youth Support Program!
RC E Room

Adrienne Foster, ASCCC Facilitator
Dione Washington, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College (LATTC)

This presentation will give an overview of the LATTC Guardian Scholars Program. It will cover how and why the program was developed, available services, long-term benefits, statistics, demographics, current events and terminology in the foster care world.

Student Engagement: Acceleration
RC F Room

Ginni May, ASCCC Facilitator
Jeanne Costello, Fullerton College
Katie Hern, California Acceleration Project
Mary Legner, Riverside City College
Toni Parsons, San Diego Mesa College
Becky Rudd, Citrus College

In efforts to increase the number of students who ultimately complete transfer-level math and English, faculty have been redesigning curriculum to streamline developmental sequences and effectively prepare students for success at the transfer level. Such curricular redesign, which often falls under the heading of acceleration, has been successfully implemented in a variety of ways across the state. This panel will share effective models of acceleration and their impact on student outcomes.

Online: Common Course Design Issues
MR 7 Room

Dolores Davison, ASCCC Facilitator
Michelle Pilati, Online Education Initiative
Anna Stirling, @ONE

Quality online course design includes intuitive navigation, content that flows in a logical progression, and dividing content into manageable segments within learning modules. What common mistakes do faculty make when designing their online courses? What are some best practices for ensuring your course is designed to maximize the likelihood that your students will succeed? This session will highlight best practices and provide you with ideas for reviewing and revising your online course to facilitate student learning.

6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Technology Showcase
Lower Concourse

This Reception is hosted by CCC technology projects and will feature the CCC Technology Fair. Grab some hors d’oeuvre and mingle with other attendees while you visit multiple stations, with presentations and project leadership on hand to answer questions and quickly bring you up to speed on the progress and status of each of the projects and its services. The Technology Fair will feature the Online Education Initiative, the Education Planning Initiative, the Common Assessment Initiative, ASSIST (CCC/CSU/UC course articulation), CCCApply (the online application for admission), and eTranscript California. Funded by the CCC Chancellor’s Office, these projects offer centralized services developed with CCC faculty and staff specifically for the students of California’s community colleges. Join us at the CCC Technology Fair to learn how these system-wide technology services can directly support you and your students. We’ll see you there!

6:00 p.m. – 7:15 p.m. Reception

7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Pub Crawl
Lower Concourse

The Academic Senate Foundation is sponsoring “The Taste of Riverside Pub Crawl”. If you made a reservation to join your colleagues to sample the best of Riverside dining in a fun and social setting, please meet us in the Riverside Convention Center Lobby.

Friday January 22, 2016

6:45 a.m. – 7:45 a.m. Pilates with Pilati
MR 6 (Lower Level)

Start the day right! Join fellow attendees for a one-hour Pilates session. Plan ahead and bring a mat, or improvise with borrowed towels. This Pilates mat class will focus on developing core strength, flexibility, and stamina. Appropriate for all levels - no previous Pilates experience needed.

8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast
Exhibit Hall C/D

9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Fourth Breakout Session

Instructional Strategies: Andragogy for Community College Instructors
RC A Room

Adrienne Foster, ASCCC Facilitator
Lourdes Brent, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Angela Echeverri, LACCD District Academic Senate
Don Gauthier, LACCD District Academic Senate
Alex Immerblum, East Los Angeles College
Ayesha Randall, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College

The Los Angeles Community College District Academic Senate (DAS) is presently working on a project aimed at new and legacy faculty to address andragogy—the needs of adult learners—and techniques for engaging students in their own learning. In part, this project is designed to address the deficit in classroom training that is not usually included in the master’s or doctorate subject area expertise of most faculty. This approach is designed to help move the needle on student success by providing the tools for addressing the needs of our students within and outside the classroom. The DAS Professional Development College is envisioned as a series of stacked courses that will allow faculty to progress to a full certificate focused on community college learners and the needs of unprepared students.

Collaborative Efforts: Professional Development for Online Faculty
RC B Room

Dolores Davison, ASCCC Facilitator
Fabiola Torres, Glendale College

In-house distance education (DE) professional development can take place through embracing DE faculty enthusiasts and the college’s Course Management System. With a close partnership with Staff Development and Distance Education Coordinators, activities can be designed via the Course Management System and provide faculty with new and improved skill sets, inspirations, and techniques that can augment their learning environments while they earn badges to authenticate the completion of activities. Participants in this breakout will receive in-house DE professional development using innovative tools and practices to reach online faculty.

Institutionalization: BioFeud—A Collaborative Activity that Promotes Learning
RC C Room

Craig Rutan, ASCCC Facilitator
Kristina Gonzales, Los Angeles Mission College
Par Mohammadian, Los Angeles Mission College

Studies have shown that integrated student support services such as tutoring, counseling, advising, and mentoring play a major role in student success. Many part-time community college students are unable to utilize these services on their campuses due to their work or family obligations. Lack of tutoring support, for example, has shown to contribute to lower retention, success, and transfer rates. To overcome this obstacle in collaboration with the tutoring center, Los Angeles Mission College designed a mini-review session called “BioFeud.” BioFeud review game runs from 45 minutes to an hour and covers the key concepts of all lab materials that are taught throughout the semester. The BioFeud sessions are now being used in eight labs, and student surveys indicate that the students learn from these interactive reviews while enjoying the competitive process. This approach assists community college students with demanding schedules to receive needed academic support services in the lab or class in a short period of time.

Fostering Innovation: Effective Practices for Department Chairs —Supporting a Student-Centered Culture
RC D Room

John Stanskas, ASCCC Facilitator
Susan Bangasser, San Bernardino Valley College

Most colleges are organized with a faculty leader to guide the processes of a group of discipline experts, both full- and part-time. This role can easily become mired in compliance of filling out student learning outcome reports, program review reports, needs assessment requests, and scheduling. However, for most part-time faculty, the department chair is the sole point of contact with the institution. This workshop is designed to share effective practices that benefit all faculty in the department and ultimately the students and college as a whole.

Student Data: The Express to Success Program
RC E Room

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC Facilitator
Cosima Celmayster-Rincon, Santa Barbara City College
Pam Guenther, Santa Barbara City College
Kathy Molloy, Santa Barbara City College

Attendees will learn about Santa Barbara City Colleges’ Express to Success Program (ESP), which offers accelerated learning communities in developmental math and English for students who assess at one to two levels below college level. Three instructional models will be discussed, as will the important role of ESP counselors who work with instructors and students both inside and outside of the classroom. Data will be presented that shows course completion, success, and persistence rates that far exceed the college average. Long-term data will also be presented that shows significant increases in cohort completion of college level math and English courses, numbers of degrees awarded, and numbers of students who achieve transfer-ready status. ESP students complete two levels of accelerated math or English in one semester at a 40% to 50% higher rate than students taking traditional courses over a two semester period, with Latino and low-income ESP students making the largest gains of all when compared to their peers.

Student Engagement: Programs At-A-Glance—Designing Course Sequencing Flowcharts
RC F Room

Ginni May, ASCCC Facilitator
Brook Oliver, Sierra College

As we ask our students to participate in creating their student educational plans, visual aids such as flowcharts to show sequencing of courses, including advisories and pre-requisites, can communicate faculty intent and program flow better, more quickly and more accessibly than time with a counselor. This practice can allow counseling sessions to be used to answer individual questions and issues. Such charting can also be used to determine larger curriculum solutions around over-all section and FTES planning and allocation. Attendees will be provided with examples from a number of colleges and hear from one college that is implementing this system for its curriculum and how it is being used.

Online: Facilitating Student Success Using the OEI Readiness Modules
MR 7 Room

John Freitas, ASCCC Facilitator
Anita Crawley, Online Education Initiative (OEI)
Joe Perret, Los Angeles Pierce College

The OEI’S Readiness Program Quest for Online Success is an essential tool for new online students and is available at no cost. This program empowers students to take charge of their own success by allowing them a unique opportunity to improve any areas of weakness prior to the beginning of their first online course. Some of the principles guiding the development of the program include understanding the demands of online learning, identifying areas which may prove challenging to online students, and providing the relevant resources to strengthen those weaknesses. In this session, presenters will discuss ways to integrate the Quest modules into an online course.

Vendor: Customized Engagement —Faculty-Controlled Technology Solutions for Improving Student Success
MR 8 Room

David Morse, ASCCC Facilitator
Steve Hammersly, Pearson
Patrick McCallum, Collaborative Brain Trust

Join the Collaborative Brain Trust (CBT) as they unveil a customized and contextualized curriculum tool that provides robust student analytics and just-in-time student progress alerts. Working with Pearson, CBT is providing community colleges with a new way to enhance their student success. Through this partnership, community colleges can now offer courses that are hybrid or online that imbed faculty-driven basic skills curriculum. This new system also can be used to embed career technical education curriculum into non-career technical education courses to enhance the student experience and connects academia to careers.

Instructional Strategies: Accelerated Career Technical Education Program Scheduling with 97% retention
MR 9 Room

Grant Goold, ASCCC Facilitator
Kevin Fleming, Norco College

Utilizing a Department of Labor Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant, Norco College dramatically altered the scheduling of their manufacturing and industrial automation programs. Instead of taking two years, students completed their for-credit certificate in just six months. The results exceeded expectations: 97% retention, 120% increase in completion, and over 70% employment placement, exceeding the institution’s set standard. Participants will discuss the strategies employed in altering the instructional design with an eye towards county and Workforce Investment Board collaboration and accelerated student completion.

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m. Coffee Break

10:45 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Fifth Breakout Session

Instructional Strategies: Utilizing Noncredit in Innovative Ways to Increase Student Success
RC A Room

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC Facilitator
Diane Edwards-LiPera, Southwestern College
Jolena Grande, Cypress College
Raine Hambly, School of Continuing Education
Donna Necke, Mt. San Antonio College

Many colleges have shown interest in noncredit courses but are not quite certain of how they can be used. Join this panel of representatives from colleges who are using noncredit curricula in ways that serve AB86/Adult Education Block Grant needs, workforce needs, and basic skills needs. Learn about what they are doing, how they implemented the courses and programs they have, and what roadblocks they encountered. Leave with innovative ideas for developing and using noncredit on your own college.

Collaborative Efforts: First Year Experience at West Valley College - A Growing Collaboration Between Student Services and Instruction
RC B Room

Cynthia Rico, ASCCC Facilitator
Gretchen Ehlers, West Valley College
Christina Llerena, West Valley College

West Valley College’s First Year Experience (FYE) program has expanded from an initial cohort of 30 students to today’s group of 100 students. This presentation will focus on the evolving structure of the FYE cohorts, the collaboration between academic instructors and counselors, and the low-cost funding model for the program. This year’s FYE students take a College Success course taught by an FYE counselor and a math and/or English FYE class. This wrap-around support is ideal for students who are new to college and seek support in developing behaviors that will help them move toward their academic goals. An unexpected outcome of West Valley College’s FYE program has been an amazing and supportive community of instructors from different disciplines. Presenters will discuss how they maintain this vibrant teaching community.

Institutionalization: New Faculty Development —Growing Institutional Leaders
RC C Room

David Morse, ASCCC President
Kay Weiss, San Bernardino Valley College

The California Community College System is in the process of spending $62.5 million on full-time faculty this year, and an additional $80 million for more full-time faculty has been requested for next year in the budget. Colleges need to have systems in place to effectively orient and guide this large number of new faculty members. Academic senates and their colleges need to create an environment for new faculty to that makes them feel welcomed and appreciated and that helps them develop and grow into tomorrow’s leaders. Join us for a lively discussion with examples of how faculty, colleges, and students can all benefit.

Student Engagement: High Challenge, High Support Math Instruction for Streamlining Paths to Transfer
RC D Room

Ginni May, ASCCC Facilitator
Hal Huntsman, City College of San Francisco
Faun Maddux, West Valley College
Rebecca Wong, West Valley College

In order for students to succeed in math courses, instructors must keep them productively engaged with the course material and activities. This session will provide concrete strategies from two colleges that have established an activity-based math curriculum. Both colleges have successfully redesigned developmental math pathways to improve completion of transfer math requirements for students placed into remediation. Faculty from West Valley College will share activities that reduce fear and increase student motivation. Faculty from City College of San Francisco will focus on strategies for engaging students in low stakes collaborative practice with challenging mathematical activities. Both colleges will also share data on completion of college math for students in these redesigned math pathways.

Online: Promoting Online Course Quality —Adopting and Employing a Standard to Improve Student Outcomes
RC E Room

Dolores Davison, ASCCC Facilitator
Pat James, Online Education Initiative
Michelle Pilati, Online Education Initiative

The Online Education Initiative’s Course Design Rubric is one of many available standards that can be locally adopted to effectively communicate a college’s vision of a quality course. This presentation will examine common elements of such standards and how can they be integrated into a college’s processes and culture to improve the quality of online instruction and, consequently, student outcomes.

Technology: The Flipped Classroom using Zoom or Other Live Online Conferencing Tools
RC F Room

John Freitas, ASCCC Facilitator
Joe Safdie, San Diego Mesa College

The idea of the flipped classroom is not new, but the integration of online conferencing tools such as Zoom changes the game: students can easily conference together and work on collaborative projects or oral reports or simply meet as study groups. Online lectures and course materials can be supplemented by student conferences and collaborations. Programs such as Zoom have made online conferencing much easier for students and moderators than it has ever been, and the benefits of the traditional flipped classroom can now be incorporated into online courses. Learn how to improve your effectiveness as an instructor by working with your students through live conferencing as they solve problems online.

Vendor: Tech Bells and Whistles for Student Engagement
MR 7 Room

Wheeler North, ASCCC Facilitator
Torria Davis, California Baptist University

Student engagement is key to student success. This session will show faculty one tool they can use today in a face-to-face, hybrid, or fully online class, one tool they can use tomorrow, and one tool they can use by the start of the next semester. Participants will create a poll using a free web tool called Poll Everywhere, a music video to introduce themselves to their online class using Animoto, and an interactive lecture using a free web tool called Livebinder. Depending on technology available, this presentation will be a live demonstration or a series of screenshots that illustrate how to use the tools. Presentation handouts will be made available to participants through the presenter’s website at TorriaDavis.Com/Presentations.

Instructional Strategies: Maintaining Strategic Relevance: Best Practices in CTE Program Viability & Discontinuance
MR 8 Room

Grant Goold, ASCCC Facilitator
Kevin Fleming, Norco College

The Program and Course Approval Handbook provides over 200 pages of guidance for creating and modifying curriculum, but the community college system’s guidance for program discontinuance is less robust. This presentation shares the result of a statewide policy analysis and case studies of successful program discontinuance. Tangible recommendations for implementing program viability and discontinuance processes at colleges will be presented for discussion.

12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Third General Session
Exhibit Hall B

Panel Discussion
Civic Engagement and Global Citizenship in Higher Education: The Role of the Community College

Julie Bruno, ASCCC Facilitator
Manuel Baca, Rio Hondo College
Dolores Davison, Foothill College
Cynthia Reiss, West Valley College
Patricia Robinson, College of the Canyons

Community college educators have a responsibility not only to impart discipline knowledge and skill but also to prepare students to be civically engaged and informed citizens who contribute to and participate in a rapidly changing, interconnected world. Civic engagement describes philosophies and activities that bridge thought with action to create a mindset steeped in personal awareness that encourages contribution to the welfare of one’s community, nation, and world. Research indicates that the sooner students embrace civic and constitutional knowledge, the more likely they will remain civically aware and socially engaged throughout their lifetimes. This session will discuss the unique role our colleges play in preparing students to be engaged global citizens. The panelists will explore existing models, classroom strategies, and implementation challenges. They will also discuss success and equity by examining social, political, and cultural issues and the ways in which the interdisciplinary nature of global citizenship and civic engagement can provide a framework of high-impact practices to engage students, resulting in increased levels of success. Finally, they will discuss a possible statewide initiative to foster civic engagement and social responsibility throughout our colleges.

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. Break

2:15 p.m. – 3:45 p.m. Sixth Breakout Session

Instructional Strategies: Embedding Basic Skills Support into Face-to-face and Online Courses
RC A Room

Ginni May, ASCCC Facilitator
Barbara Illowsky, Online Education Initiative

Approximately 70% of students come to community colleges with basic skills needs. This breakout will show how to embed independent modules for some just in time refreshing and learning. The presenters will discuss a selection of materials, primarily open educational resources, that can help students so that faculty can spend their time teaching the course content. The session will show how to embed basic skills, including demonstrations of how some faculty colleagues are already doing so.

Collaborative Efforts: Growth Mindset in the Disciplines - A Collaborative Approach to Instructional Innovation
RC B Room

Wheeler North, ASCCC Facilitator
Jeanne Costello, Fullerton College
Kristine Nikkhoo, Fullerton College
Miguel Powers, Fullerton College

Students with a growth mindset are more likely to be successful in their academic endeavors. However, few programs support faculty and students in developing growth mindsets in a strategic, consistent way. This presentation will share how the research from a faculty inquiry group led to a multi-pronged, campus-wide approach to improving student success: a new intervention supported by the Basic Skills Initiative, a series of professional development learning workshops, and student-led presentations in classes across disciplines. Presenters will include details on the faculty-led research behind the intervention, information on the development of the program, student voices on the benefits, and preliminary research from the first semester of implementation. The goal of this presentation is to share a model for how growth mindset education and support can be institutionalized and scaled across campus and into a variety of disciplines so that a campus can support a thriving growth mindset culture on a large scale.

Institutionalization: What Might a Faculty-led Global Citizenship Initiative Look Like?
RC C Room

Julie Bruno, ASCCC Facilitator
Dulce Marie Gray, West Valley College
Andrew Kindon, West Valley College
Cynthia Reiss, West Valley College

The presenters will discuss how a group of faculty with supportive administrators implemented a committee initiative that has become an important part of their institutional structure. The achievements include inter – to intra – faculty learning communities, a collaborative CSU Global Studies Certificate, pipeline partnerships with both San Jose State University and local high schools, career technical education global entrepreneurship workshops, notable extra-curricular events and speakers for students, annual global conferences, annual global sustainability symposiums, and faculty training seminars in Salzburg and Indiana. In greater detail, the presenters will discuss the making of the strategic plan, partnerships that have been integral to the initiative, the committee’s desire to affect student engagement and success, the role of faculty collaboration, and challenges they have encountered as well as new ideas planned in the next year.

Fostering Innovation: Creating a Path to Success for Incarcerated Students
RC D Room

Cleavon Smith, ASCCC Facilitator
BJ Snowden, Chancellor’s Office

This workshop will explore from the state and college levels how community colleges can build their capacity for creating educational programs for the incarcerated and formally incarcerated. The presenters will examine current legislation, pilot programs, and future funding opportunities and will discuss challenges and recommendations to ensure high quality and impactful programs. Other topics will include policy hurdles and ways in which the state’s existing structures can bring education and criminal justice together through educational programs.

Student Engagement: Online Counseling Services
RC E Room

Cynthia Rico, ASCCC Facilitator
Marissa Iliscupidez, Norco College

In 2013, the Norco College Counseling Department sought to increase student services to its distance education students by offering more interactive online counseling experience. This presentation will detail how Norco College developed a synchronous online counseling experience that includes audio/visual interaction, presentation mode, desktop sharing, YouTube integration, and polls, surveys, and quizzes to assess the student learning outcomes of workshops, as well as hosting an online workshop series called Web Workshop Wednesdays each semester. The breakout will demonstrate how effective online counseling services provided an opportunity for distance education students or students who may have challenges getting to the college campus to access counseling services or information on transfer, support services, and student success strategies.

Technology: Utilizing Technology to Enhance Time-on-task and Critical Thinking Skills
RC F Room

Grant Goold, ASCCC Facilitator
Deborah Rosenthal, Bakersfield College

Electronic classroom management systems assist in developing flipped classrooms or variations of the concept. Pre-chapter quizzes can cover rote terminology and embed videos for concepts that demand mental visualization. When students attend class and encounter the information a second time, lectures and activities are more productive and students’ confidence is enhanced. Ultimately, the goal is for students to form a deliberate habit of covering material in all their courses before it is presented in the classroom.

One objective of this presentation is to encourage faculty to use technology for lower-level instruction to increase time students are exposed to their subject. Participants will be asked to be aware of their own critical thinking skills and model a series of mental questioning that can introduced to students using technology.

Vendor: Getting Active - Student Engagement with Café Learn
MR 7 Room

David Morse, ASCCC President
Carrie O’Donnell, Café Learn
Michael Grimshaw, 
California State University Dominguez Hills

The presentation will feature a demonstration of Café Learn’s next generation courseware platform that aims to boost student performance by promoting active learning in higher-education classrooms. Café Learn’s innovative features allow instructors to teach with measurable learning outcomes, affordable and open educational resources, and hands-on strategies to their students. In this way, Café Learn looks to address three main issues in the current educational landscape: affordability, student engagement, and student retention.

Collaboration: All About Building Bridges - Developing Strategic Partnerships in Your Community and Statewide
MR 8 Room

Randy Beach, ASCCC Facilitator
Amanda Joy Davis, “I Can Afford College”

This presentation will focus on building strategic partnerships and on the California Community Colleges ‘I Can Afford College’ Statewide Financial Aid Awareness Campaign and how it can help current and prospective students. The session will include information on building partnerships with organizations and businesses in local communities and across the state to promote colleges and programs and to support student success and completion through establishing these partnerships. Attendees will learn about identifying potential partner organizations, reaching out to potential partners, working together to achieve college goals, and best practices for developing partnerships that are successful and effective for both college programs and partner programs or organizations. The breakout will also provide case studies from the ‘I Can Afford College’ campaign on successful partnerships that have been forged with organizations over the past ten years.

3:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Break

4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Seventh Breakout Session

Instructional Strategies: Music as a Bridge for Collaboration to Disciplines in the Humanities and Beyond
RC A Room

Cleavon Smith, ASCCC Facilitator
Max Hembd, Clovis College

Using music as a foundation for discussion of seemingly non-musical topics allows students to tap into their cultural self-identity while providing a context to analyze their past and current experiences. Throughout this presentation, the presenter will leverage the excitement around musical performance to connect to as many non-musical disciplines as possible, including creative writing, physics, anthropology, art, psychology and others. The focus of this breakout will be on instructional strategies and collaborative efforts. By partnering with other faculty for shared lecture experiences, panels, and co-taught courses, faculty can foster opportunities for students to have more meaningful connections with other discipline faculty and students.

Collaboration: Bay Area Shared Remote Access ICT Lab System
RC B Room

Grant Goold, ASCCC Facilitator
Gerlinde Brady, Cabrillo College
Richard Grotegut, Cabrillo College

The Bay-Area Colleges share a 24/7 Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Remote Lab System that uses NETLAB+. NETLAB+ is a combination of software and hardware that enable faculty and students from any internet accessible location to utilize a virtual lab environment designed to provide employer-demanded hands-on experience with a variety of computer operating systems, real networking equipment, and application software. The remote lab system can accommodate up to 16,128 individual 3-hour lab sessions during any 24/7 week. The shared lab facility provides a platform for regional collaboration for colleges that offer ICT curriculum. While generally implemented as a single college solution, this approach is designed to meet the needs of multiple colleges. This presentation will cover how to plan and implement a shared ICT Lab system, how to utilize the system to support hands-on training of ICT students, and how to start building career pathways from high schools to community colleges.

Institutionalizing Student Success: Redesigning Curriculum and Restructuring Pathways to Accelerate Students through English Course Sequences
RC C Room

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC Facilitator
Kim Orlijan, Fullerton College
Jeff Rhyne, Moreno Valley College
Becky Rudd, Citrus College

This presentation will describe how the English programs at each of the presenters’ colleges are addressing equity issues using curricular redesign and restructuring of course pathways in English. The presenters each participated at their separate colleges in the development of new courses that help more students reach and succeed at college-level English classes. The presenters will discuss changes to the English pathway at their colleges, the content and student learning outcomes of the new courses, the innovative instructional changes involved in the new class, the data showing greater college-level course completion as a result of the innovations, and the new faculty development opportunities that have emerged at each college as a result of these changes.

Fostering Innovation: Constructing a Learning Environment
RC D Room

Dolores Davison, ASCCC Facilitator
Adesanya (Sanya) Soyemi, Mt. San Jacinto College
Fabiola Torres, Glendale College

Construction of new buildings and facilities might not be an explicit part of the 10+1 for academic senates, but classroom design, technology, and other elements should be of concern to faculty for a wide range of pedagogical reasons. Faculty need to engage in these discussions on their campuses to ensure that their voices are heard. Join us for a discussion of faculty involvement in these projects.

Student Engagement: Working Holistically with Your Students Using Starfish Degree Planner
RC E Room

Cynthia Rico, ASCCC Facilitator
Lidia Jenkins, City College of San Francisco
Renee Craig Marius, Fresno City College
Robyn Tornay, California Community Colleges Technology Center

Education plans are proven to contribute to student success, and the Chancellor’s Office has secured an education-planning tool to help colleges obtain software and implementation services for those who need them. Nine districts across the state are piloting the education planning tools, which will soon be available to all California community colleges. This presentation will highlight the benefits of electronic education planning for those colleges that have been seeking to move from paper education plans and that wish to assist counseling departments to support a stronger counseling appointment.

Technology: Implementing ePortfolios for Faculty, Staff, and Student Engagement
RC F Room

Craig Rutan, ASCCC Facilitator
Brittany Applen, College of the Canyons
Alexa Dimakos, College of the Canyons

Engagement and community are factors that improve student learning, retention, and completion. At College of the Canyons, the first phase of a new ePortfolio initiative is underway that leverages technology to help make learning visible while strengthening a sense of community within the classroom and across the college community. The leaders of this initiative believe the effective use of ePortfolios as a pedagogical tool may help improve course success rates for disproportionally impacted populations of students and help students better achieve and demonstrate the attainment of course, program, and institution student learning outcomes. The presenters will share their experiences regarding implementing ePortfolios campus-wide.

Online: The Distance Ed Classroom, Online Student Services, and Standard II - Putting Your Best Feet Forward
MR 7 Room

Randy Beach, ASCCC Facilitator
Stephanie Curry, Reedley College
Michael Heumann, Imperial Valley College

Accreditation Standard II (Student Learning Programs and Support Services) is a ripe opportunity for highlighting innovations in a college’s distance education classroom design. In this breakout, attendees can pick up tips for defining and implementing regular and effective contact that saves time and enhances relationships with students as well as tips for collecting and providing effective evidence in self-evaluation and other areas related to Standard II.

Saturday, January 23, 2016

7:30 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. Breakfast Buffet
Exhibit Hall C/D

8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Eighth Breakout Session

Instructional Strategies: The Future of Open Educational Resources in California
RC A Room

Cheryl Aschenbach, ASCCC Facilitator
Dan Crump, American River College
Dolores Davison, Foothill College

Open Educational Resources (OER) are a frequent topic of discussion in community colleges these days, in part because of the work of the California Open Educational Resources Council (CA-OERC), an intersegmental group of faculty working in response to SB 1052 (Steinberg, 2012) to promote use of OER by identifying resources for faculty who wish to adopt these materials in their classes. What is OER, what do OER materials look like, why is OER so revolutionary, and how can faculty use these resources to not only save their students money but potentially to improve their own pedagogy? Presenters will discuss the work of the CA-OER Council and the future of OER in California.

Collaborative Efforts: General Education and Quantitative Reasoning
RC B Room

Ginni May, ASCCC Facilitator
Stephanie Briggs, San Bernardino Valley College
John Stanskas, San Bernardino Valley College

Since 2006 and the raising of the associate’s degree graduation requirement to intermediate algebra, the California Community College System has focused on pathways and models that may help students achieve this requirement. Recent action by the California State University (CSU) Academic Senate calls for a task force to establish what the baccalaureate level standard in quantitative reasoning, CSU-GE Breadth Area B4, should be. This discussion opens the door even further to engage all faculty in a central question: what do we expect of all students who earn a college degree in the area of quantitative reasoning and how do we help them achieve that standard? Join us for a discussion about the pros and cons of various pathways developed in the last decade and how they shape our understanding of quantitative reasoning expectations.

Institutionalization: Designing a Completion Initiative: Our Response to the Question, “What do you mean our students aren’t completing?!”
RC C Room

Craig Rutan, ASCCC Facilitator
Greg Aycock, Norco College
Melissa Bader, Norco College
Peggy Campo, Norco College
Diane Dieckmeyer, Norco College
Monica Green, Norco College
John Moore, Norco College
Jason Parks, Norco College

This presentation will be an honest discussion about the challenges and triumphs Norco College has faced in implementing a completion initiative to address its low completion rates, especially focusing on its lowest performing groups: African-Americans, Hispanics, part-time students, and older students. The completion initiative involves college-wide structural changes such as the creation of meta majors, faculty advisement models, college-to-career linkages, student ambassador models, and the development of clear and directed pathways for students. The presenters will share the strategies they are implementing to include all stakeholders, the radical ideas they are pursuing, the excitement of moving into uncharted waters, and the sometimes rocky road they are still traveling in their efforts to move the institution in a new direction.

Fostering Innovation: Pathways to Academic, Career and Transfer Success (PACTS): LATTC’s College-Wide Institutional Innovation for Student Success
RC D Room

Grant Goold, ASCCC Facilitator
Leticia Barajas, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Maurice Burnett, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Michelle Cheang, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Martin Diaz, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
David Esparza, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Larry Frank, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Maryanne Galindo, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Jess Guerra, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Henan Joof, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Kaneesha Tarrant, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Marcia Wilson, Los Angeles Trade-Technical College
Mark Wilson, Coalition for Responsible Community Development

This panel will describe LATTC’s Pathways to Academic, Career and Transfer Success (PACTS), the college’s transformative approach to improving student success and equity. PACTS is a sequence of innovative postsecondary instructional programs and activities, with coordinated supportive services, designed to provide individuals with competencies needed to successfully access a college education, attain industry-recognized and post-secondary credentials, and obtain careers that offer opportunities for advancement and growth. Presenters will describe how PACTS will increase rates of transfer due to “guided choices” and innovations at each Tier of the PACTS framework.

Student Engagement: Basic Skills Mathematics Instruction —Steps and Stages of a Scaled-up Program
RC E Room

Cleavon Smith, ASCCC Facilitator
Alex Miranda, Golden West College

This presentation will focus on the components of a successful mathematics program for college-bound high school seniors, including the process to institutionalize it at a college that serves a diverse student population. The presentation will cover several topics: 1) the characteristics of a mathematics mock assessment experience for high school students from which six-week instructional intervention was developed and implemented at local high schools; 2) a mathematics bridge program called Jumpstart that prepared students for entrance and success into two basic skills mathematics courses; 3) the design of two basic skills mathematics courses complemented by mathematics tutoring services, mathematics workshops, and an on-line diagnostic and tracking software tailored to increase student engagement and learning; and 4) an assessment strategy to evaluate student progress via a multiple-measures perspective.

Online: Using Publisher Generated Materials
RC F Room

John Freitas, ASCCC Facilitator
Pat James, Online Education Initiative
Michelle Pilati, Online Education Initiative

Proprietary materials are a million-dollar industry, and while abuses do occur, many faculty have successfully integrated these materials into their own course content. This breakout will highlight effective and pedagogically sound practices for the use of proprietary materials in online classes and beyond.

Technology: New Learning Models — Implications for Future Learning Spaces
MR 7 Room

Wheeler North, ASCCC Facilitator
W. Cherry Li-Bugg, North Orange County Community College District
Lucien G. Runge, R²A Architecture

Students’ use of technology today is creating a major shift toward a new regenerative educational pedagogy and learning models. The new learning models will require a significant transformation in curriculum content and the role of educators. The technological advances will also cause a major shift in education-based architecture. The mission forward for the community colleges is to fully embrace technology and ensure that the teaching and learning environment is adaptable to the ever-evolving high-tech world. This mission will require design thinking and has huge implications for the design and construction of learning spaces on campus. This session is designed as collective conversation around the impact of technology on new learning models and future learning spaces.

10:15 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. Fourth General Session
Exhibit Hall B

Institutional Effectiveness Partnership Initiative: Reflections on Partnership Resource Team Visits

Randy Beach, ASCCC Facilitator
Santanu Bandyopadhyay, Cypress College
Diana Bennett, College of San Mateo
May Chen, Berkeley City College
Maureen Chenoweth, Foothill College
Matthew C. Lee, Institutional Effectiveness Partnership Initiative EPI
Bill McGinnis, Butte College
Kindred Murillo, Lake Tahoe College
Lisa Solomon, Imperial Valley College
Jeff Spano, Chancellor’s Office

Observations about the Partnership Resource Teams (PRTs) PRT process from faculty, staff, and administrators who served on teams, who led teams, and whose institutions received team visits, including surprises, useful practices, and some of the challenges they encountered.