Program of Events

Click on a day to view program for that day.

Thursday, April 18
Friday, April 19
Saturday, April 20

 

Thursday, April 18, 2013

7:00 a.m. to 8:15 a.m. Registration/Delegate Sign In
Westin Ballroom Foyer

7:00 a.m. to 8:15 a.m. Continental Breakfast
Westin Ballroom Foyer

7:45 a.m. to 8:15 a.m. Candidate Information Session
Room: Laurel
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Elections Chair

7:45 a.m. to 8:15 a.m. New Delegate Information Session
Room: Hickory/Hawthorne
Kevin Bontenbal, Resolutions Committee Chair

9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Consultation Council Meeting
Room: Cypress (2nd Floor)
The Consultation Council was established by AB1725 as a mechanism for system input to the Chancellor on state-level issues, particularly those to come before the Board of Governors. The Consultation Council has 18 members including six faculty: two from the Academic Senate and one each from CTA/CCA, CCC/CFT, CCCI, and FACCC. The Academic Senate has a special role in taking the lead to develop recommendations on academic and professional issues.

8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. FIRST BREAKOUT SESSION 

1. I'm New: Now, What the Heck Do I Do? Pointers for Plenary and Inclusiveness of Faculty at the State Level 

Room: Hickory/Hawthorne
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Standards, Equity, Access, and Practices Committee, Chair
Lesley Kawaguchi, Executive Committee Member
Katie Townsend-Merino, Palomar College

Are you a newbie to the Academic Senate plenary sessions? Been here before, but it has been a long time? Feel like everyone knows what is happening in the state but you? Feel like everyone knows everyone else but you? The truth is EACH of us was new to plenary once and we fully understand your anxieties and are here to help! Join us as we make the murky waters that can be plenary clear before your eyes. During this session you will have fun while learning how YOU are now a part of the statewide decision-making process and more. 

2. Forging an Unbreakable Bond: Strengthening the Relationship between the Curriculum Committee and the Academic Senate 

Room: Poplar
Julie Bruno, Curriculum Committee Chair
Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
Craig Rutan, Santiago Canyon College

Yvonne Valenzuela, Golden West CollegeDoes your academic senate know how the curriculum committee functions and what decisions it makes? Does the curriculum committee bring policy issues to the senate? Should it? Who makes the decisions? As we go about the day-to-day work in our academic senates and curriculum committees, it is easy to become focused on the pressing issues at hand and ignore the broader picture. Curriculum is the foundation of the work of the senate and yet sometimes the connection between the senate and curriculum committee may be tenuous. What does a "good" relationship between the academic senate and the curriculum committee look like? Join us for a discussion of strategies to ensure that these two separate committees work together as one cohesive unit. 

3. Are you ready for Adult Education? The Governor's Budget and LAO Recommendations 

Room: Laurel
Wheeler North, Treasurer
Candace Lynch-Thompson, North Orange County CCD School of Continuing Education
Linda Retterath, Mission College

Everyone has something to say regarding the fate of adult education in California. The Senate took a position in Fall 2011 stating "That the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges recommend that the Board of Governors urge the Legislature to assign responsibility for adult education to the California community colleges but only if sufficient funding to address this mission is provided." The most recent Legislative Analyst's Office (LAO) report and the Governor's January budget both suggest the responsibility for adult education should be re-allocated to the community colleges. Are you ready to talk adult education? What needs to be done on your campus to start the conversation? This breakout is intended to inform the body about current state-wide discussions of adult education and foster discussion to take back to local campuses. 

4. Linking Assessment into Your Program Review and Planning and Budget Processes 

Room: Oak
Dolores Davison, Accreditation and Assessment Committee Chair
Fred Hochstaedter, Monterey Peninsula College
Ginni May, Sacramento City College

We know that resource planning (educational, human, technology, physical, and financial) needs to be integrated into institutional planning for accreditation purposes. How do we ensure that this happens and that it remains relevant for our faculty? As college leaders, how do we ensure that assessment is linked not only to course and program reviews, but to the processes within our colleges in terms of planning? Join our discussion regarding linking planning, resources, and program review to assessment. 

5. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Regulations and Faculty Rights Regarding Student Dishonesty 

Room: Elm/Sycamore
David Morse, Secretary
Kale Braden, Cosumnes River College
Kim Harrell, Folsom Lake College

Although most students demonstrate "good" behaviors in class and hold themselves to high standards of ethics, others may demonstrate "bad" behaviors that violate the student code of conduct. Which behaviors are the most egregious, and what should the consequences be for truly "ugly" behaviors? What are the faculty's options in this area? Currently instructors cannot give students a failing grade for the course for even the "ugliest" of violations, but should they be able to do so? Come and join us to discuss "the good, the bad, and the ugly" at this breakout. 

9:45 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Break

10:00 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. SECOND BREAKOUT SESSION 

1. Senate-Union Relations: Responding Effectively to Challenges and Disruptive Forces 

Room: Hickory/Hawthorne
Lesley Kawaguchi, Executive Committee Member
Richard Hansen, President, California Community College Independents
Wheeler North, Treasurer

The academic senate and faculty bargaining agents usually have clearly defined roles, as the senate ensures faculty voice in "professional and academic matters" and the union oversees faculty salaries and working conditions. Yet several areas involve the authority of both groups, while new challenges and forces have complicated matters further. This breakout will focus on ways in which local senates can help navigate and support both groups to ensure effective faculty leadership during these challenging times. 

2. Discipline List Process 

Room: Laurel
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Standards, Equity, Access, Practices Committee Chair
Joseph Bielanski, Berkeley City College
Kevin Bontenbal, Executive Committee Member

The Academic Senate conducts the formal review of the Disciplines List, which establishes the minimum qualifications for the faculty of California community colleges. This review occurs in a two-year cycle. Come join us for a discussion about future changes to the list and to brainstorm ideas for improving the process and communication between discipline experts and the Senate. 

3. Accreditation Hot Topics 

Room: Oak
Dolores Davison, Accreditation and Assessment Chair
Fred Hochstaedter, Monterey Peninsula College
Ginni May, Sacramento City College

The recent ACCJC actions brought good news to some colleges and major concerns to others. What have colleges done to meet the recommendations and be removed from sanctions? What effective practices have been undertaken by these colleges? This breakout will focus attention on the proficiency reports, the new standards being implemented in 2014, and other hot topics that are of concern to faculty regarding accreditation. 

4. Changes in K-12 Curriculum and Potential Impact on CCC Curriculum 

Room: Elm/Sycamore
Dianna Chiabotti, Executive Committee Member
Carolyn Holcroft, Foothill College

California K-12 educators are already beginning to implement the national Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for mathematics and English that were adopted by the Legislature, and assessment of the new standards will begin in 2015. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are under review. These new standards are anticipated to affect student preparation for college, lead to differences in K-12 curriculum that may influence community college classrooms, and prompt revision of our curriculum to prepare future teachers. Join this breakout to learn about the future of mathematics, English, and science education in California. 

5. How Conjoint Programs Can Meet the Challenge of Offering Courses and Programs 

Room: Maple
Dan Crump, Legislative and External Policy Committee Member
Phil Smith, Leadership Development Committee Chair

We don't have enough FTE to offer the (fill in the blank) program! What about degree completion-what can we do? We don't have all the courses needed for that transfer degree. Come hear a discussion of how conjoint programs (as described in the PCAH) can help with CTE and C-ID and TMC and AA-T and AS-T (and also find out what the heck all these acronyms mean).

11:15 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Break

11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. FIRST GENERAL SESSION
Room: Westin Ballroom

Luncheon

Call to Order and Adoption of the Procedures
Beth Smith, Vice President

Election Nominations
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Elections Chair

State of the Senate: Rising to the Challenge: Responding to Disruptive Forces
Michelle Pilati, President

Keynote Presentation: Evidence of Student Success Amid Competing Forces

Finding evidence of student success across systems and within our system can lead to greater opportunities for faculty to lead conversations for change at their colleges. With emerging tools now available, faculty will have access to data that show how students transition from high school to community college to the universities. Many faculty know of CalPASS and its efforts to help create smoother pathways for students, and the new CalPASS Plus provides more easily accessible information about student success to community college faculty and administrators. Data alone do not make change, but informed faculty members do.

1:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Break

1:45 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. THIRD BREAKOUT SESSION

1. Truths, Myths, and Assumptions: AB1725, Title 5, and Faculty Roles in Governance Past and Present 

Room: Hickory/Hawthorne
David Morse, Governance and Internal Policy Committee Chair
Kale Braden, Cosumnes River College
Carolyn Holcroft, Foothill College

Cynthia Reiss, West Valley CollegeThe topic of shared governance in California community colleges has recently received increased attention from politicians, legislators, the public, and the news media. In this breakout we will discuss the origins and history of shared governance in AB1725 and the things it does and does not say about faculty roles in governance. After examining this context, we will explore the ways in which faculty roles in governance can be understood and applied locally to facilitate more effective participation and collaboration. 

2. Rising to the Challenge of Transfer: An Update on C-ID and TMCs 

Room: Poplar
Julie Bruno, Curriculum Committee Chair
Michelle Pilati, PresidentBarry Russell, Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs, CCCCO

Senate Bill 1440 (Padilla, 2010) was introduced due to concerns about the completion of degrees at our colleges and transfer to the California State University. While the TMC approach to the development of transfer degrees is now well-established and may be codified in law (Senate Bill 440, Padilla, 2013), what impact has the Board of Governors' goal-setting had on degree development and what challenges do colleges continue to face? What does the future hold for C-ID and when does TMC development end? Join us for an update on C-ID, TMCs, degree development, and more. 

3. Facilitating and Incentivizing Student Completion: Overcoming Locality 

Room: Laurel
Beth Smith, Legislation and External Policy Committee Chair
Karen Chow, De Anza College
Ray Hicks, Santa Ana College

Districts, colleges and even programs within a college compete for students, but is this competition healthy for students or colleges? If the goal is to help students attain their educational objectives, then shouldn't colleges (or even local programs) be joining forces to facilitate student success? This breakout will engender a lively discussion about how to remain true to the college need to meet FTES goals while recognizing that our primary focus should be helping students complete their courses of study. If your college has reached across its boundaries to help students, we'd love to hear from you. 

4. The "Awards"-Academic Senate Recognition of Programs and Faculty 

Room: Oak
Michelle Grimes-Hillman, Standards, Equity, Access, Practices Committee Chair
Cheryl Aschenbach, Lassen College
Kevin Bontenbal, Executive Committee Member

The Academic Senate conducts a minimum of three award processes each year: Exemplary Award, Hayward Award, and Stanback-Stroud Diversity Award. However, many of our campus faculty may be eligible for recognition but many colleges do not submit nominations. Come join us to learn more about the awards and to discuss the awards processes, timelines, and solicitation of nominations. 

5. Practical Leadership 

Room: Elm/Sycamore
Phil Smith, Leadership Development Committee Chair
Riley Dwyer, Moorpark College

Although senate leadership requires knowledge of the 10+1, Education Code, and Title 5, getting things done also requires some practical leadership skills like organizing your time, preparing for meetings, and resolving conflicts. In this breakout, you'll learn a few strategies for conducting committee or senate business effectively and efficiently. Audience members will be encouraged to share their favorite practical leadership tip.

6. Education Plans for Enrollment-How do We Meet the New Enrollment Priorities Requirements? 

Room: Maple
Stephanie Dumont, Executive Committee Member
Cynthia Rico, San Diego Mesa College

It is Spring 2013 and local colleges should be messaging students about the changes set to take place in enrollment priorities beginning Fall 2014. And once the information gets communicated across our campuses, students will be asking what it is they must do to ensure that coveted enrollment priority. One of the most resource-intensive elements of the new enrollment priorities regulations is the requirement that students must have an education plan in order to receive registration priority. This new mandate raises many questions: What is an education plan? Who is responsible for creating an education plan? How will colleges respond in light of consecutive years of matriculation cuts? These are just a few of the many questions this breakout attempts to address. If you have already been having these discussions on your campuses come share your ideas with us!

3:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Break

3:15 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. FOURTH BREAKOUT SESSION 

1. Faculty Qualifications, Equivalencies, and Assigning Courses to Disciplines 

Room: Hickory/Hawthorne
Wheeler North, Treasurer
Joseph Bielanski, Berkeley City College
Kevin Bontenbal, Standards, Equity, Access, and Practices Committee Chair

Both high standards and regulations require that qualified faculty teach all courses. Senate presidents may have to resolve process and implementation issues for determining faculty qualifications, equivalencies, faculty service areas and course assignments within a variety of disciplines. Come learn about these issues and more. 

2. Completion of What? 

Room: Poplar
Michelle Pilati, President
Beth Smith, Vice President

The "completion agenda", funding challenges, and an increasingly businessminded definition of high quality college education has resulted in an overemphasis on unit accumulation over the provision of education. Is a degree more than an accumulation of units and how does higher education respond to the varied forces that simultaneously encourage it to decrease quality while delivering a product with measurable value? Join us for a lively and candid discussion. 

3. Curriculum: Caution Contents are Hot (and Under Pressure!) 

Room: Laurel
Julie Bruno, Curriculum Committee Chair
Marie Boyd, Chaffey College
Barry Russell, Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs, CCCCO
Erik Shearer, Napa Valley College

Significant changes in curriculum policies and procedures continue to be on the front burner and faculty find themselves under pressure to adapt as quickly as possible at the local level. Come and discuss the latest forces affecting curriculum and ways to relieve (or reduce) the pressure. Our topics will include the Chancellor's Office guidelines on the revised repeatability regulations and the impact of ACCJC accreditation standards on our course outline of records. Please bring your questions, concerns, and effective practices to inform our discussion. 

4. iLegislation: There's A Bill For That 

Room: Oak
Dan Crump, Legislation and External Policy Committee Member
Don Gauthier, Los Angeles Valley College
Jonathan Lightman, Faculty Association of California Community Colleges (FACCC)

With over 200 bills about community colleges submitted to the Legislature, there is bound to be a bill about every aspect of faculty purview and work. From online instruction to awarding academic credit to veterans, this breakout will briefly review bills of interest to senate leaders and faculty in general. Bring your questions and concerns about bills and the impact they may have on students and colleagues to our discussion, and if the discussions lead to needed senate positions, help us craft resolutions. 

5. What Exactly is Happening with the Implementation of the Student Success and Support Program? 

Room: Elm/Sycamore
Stephanie Dumont, Executive Committee Member
Kale Braden, Cosumnes River College
Cynthia Rico, San Diego Mesa College

Come hear from the faculty representing the Senate on the Board of Governors Fee Waiver Workgroup, the MIS/Allocation Formula Workgroup and the Title 5 Regulation Workgroup. We will provide updates on the progress of each workgroup, solicit feedback and guide campuses on what can be done at the local level to prepare for these changes. 

6. Professional Development Recommendations 

Room: Maple
Dianna Chiabotti, Professional Development Committee Member
Daphne Figueroa, San Diego Miramar College
Miya Squires, Butte College

The Chancellor's Office Professional Development Committee has finished their report and recommendations. In this breakout we will discuss the recommendations, questions, and concerns. We will also ponder the benefits and consequences should the recommendations be supported by the Board of Governors and future legislation. Are there areas that we should address as a body? What are your thoughts on revitalizing and re-envisioning professional development in our system?

5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Resolution Writing
Room: Hickory/Hawthorne

5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Caucus Meetings
Room: Laurel, Oak, Maple, Elm/Sycamore

6:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Candidate Orientation
Room: Poplar

6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. President's Reception
Bayshore Ballroom


Friday, April 19

7:30 a.m. Registration/Delegate Sign in
Westin Ballroom Foyer

8:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Breakfast
Westin Ballroom Foyer

8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. SECOND GENERAL SESSION
Election Speeches
Westin Ballroom

10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon Area Meetings

Area A with Julie Bruno, Area A Representative
Room: Hickory/Hawthorne

Area B with Dolores Davison, Area B Representative
Room: Poplar

Area C with Lesley Kawaguchi, Area C Representative
Room: Laurel

Area D with Stephanie Dumont, Area D Representative
Room: Oak

12:15 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. THIRD GENERAL SESSION
Westin Ballroom

Lunch

Diversity Award Presentation

General Session

Keynote Presentation: Responding to Disruptive Forces: "Improved" Alternatives?
Armando Fox, Academic Director of the Berkeley Resource Center for Online Education
Daphne Koller, Co-Founder of Coursera

Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have been touted as being the answer to much of what ails higher education. Do MOOCs have a place in the California community colleges? The perspectives of two MOOC providers will be shared and your questions answered. 

2:30 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. FIFTH BREAKOUT SESSION 

1. Creating a Toolbox: Effective Nuts and Bolts for New Senate Leaders 

Room: Hickory/Hawthorne
Dianna Chiabotti, Executive Committee Member
Lesley Kawaguchi, Executive Committee Member

Once upon a time, a former local senate president remarked, "You don't know what you don't know." What tools do you need to navigate your way as a senate leader?

This is an opportunity to learn about the processes, rules, roles, and effective practices senate leaders need to understand the authority of the senate as well as the obligations to consult collegially.

2. Here's My Number, So Call Me Maybe: When to Contact the Chancellor's Office and When Not To

Room: Poplar
Julie Bruno, System Advisory Committee on Curriculum Member
Kale Braden, Cosumnes River College
Kim Harrell, Folsom Lake College
Sally Lenz, CCC Chancellor's Office
David Morse, Long Beach City College

With all of the changes occurring to educational policy and Title 5 regulations, colleges may have difficulty understanding which decisions are directed by Title 5 or Education Code and which ones are left to local control. This breakout will help to identify the resources available to colleges to help understand these ever-shifting policies and will attempt to clarify when decisions should be made locally as well as the circumstances under which a call to the Chancellor's Office may be necessary.

3. Responding to Disruptive Forces: MOOCs and Their Consequences

Room: Laurel
Dolores Davison, Distance Education Ad Hoc Committee Chair
Michelle Pilati, President

Do massive open online courses (MOOCs) have a place in California's system of higher education? Do we need to set aside our MOOC-fatigue and consider what, if anything, MOOCs and the MOOC approach to education might do for our students? How do we control the consequences of MOOC-mania?

4. The Scorecard, Disproportionate Impact, and Student Equity

Room: Oak
Beth Smith, Legislation and External Policies Committee Chair
Don Gauthier, Los Angeles Valley College

Who are the students who are passing our classes and completing our programs? Who are the students who are struggling to find success? The new scorecard reveals a great deal about how a college serves its students, and senates should be aware of how the data are compiled and what they mean. In order to serve all the students at the college well, what information do we need about the populations that we serve and their progress? Join this breakout to learn about measuring student equity and its effect on college performance as detailed on the new scorecard.

5. Wait! We're Applying for What? Local Grants Processes and Faculty Roles

Room: Elm/Sycamore
Dan Crump, Executive Committee Member
Carolyn Holcroft, Foothill College
Craig Rutan, Santiago Canyon College

As our colleges search for additional funding, grants can become an attractive option. Procuring grant funding often involves tight deadlines and pressure to expedite curricular processes. Faculty must rise to this challenge by considering whether established processes are sufficient or whether local processes need revision to enable colleges to pursue grant funding while maintaining quality curriculum and sustainable programs. Please join us to discuss ideas about strategies to keep your local senate and curriculum committee in the driver's seat.

6. Model Curriculum (C-ID Phase Two)-Certificates (low and high unit) AS Degrees and Career Readiness

Room: Maple
Wheeler North, Statewide Career Pathways Faculty Coordinator
Phil Smith, Leadership Development Committee Chair

Defining pathways that maximize options benefits students. Currently there are a variety of parallel efforts seeking this, such as high school programs of study, Statewide Career Pathways (SCP) articulation, K12 efforts to define college and career readiness standards and CCCCO incentives for regional coordination of community college certificate and degree programs. The next phase of C-ID and SCP will provide the interconnecting framework by mapping common courses and pathways in non-transfer programs where existing factors make this possible. Come join us as we explore this remarkable vision.

4:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Resolution Amendment Discussion
Room: Hickory/Hawthorne

4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Discipline Hearings
Room: Laurel

4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Candidate Forum
Room: Oak

5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Caucus Meetings
Room: Laurel, Oak, Maple, Elm/Sycamore

5:15 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Foundation Reception
Room: Aspen

6:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Executive Committee Meeting
Room: President's Suite
The purpose of this meeting is to entertain any "urgent" resolutions. You can review Resolution Procedures here: www.asccc.org/session/resolutions.

 

Saturday, April 20

7:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. Final Delegate Sign In
Westin Ballroom Foyer

7:30 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. Breakfast
Westin Ballroom Foyer

8:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. FOURTH GENERAL SESSION
Westin Ballroom

Announcements

Elections Begin

Resolution Voting Begins

12:00 p.m. to 12:45 p.m. Lunch Buffet
Westin Ballroom

Secretary's Report
David Morse, Secretary

Treasurer's Report
Wheeler North, Treasurer

1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. FOURTH GENERAL SESSION CONTINUES
Westin Ballroom